Coursework Cover Sheet Ucl

Project

Applies to all modern foreign language course units.

The main piece of coursework is the Project (worth 20-30% depending on level), which also forms the basis of the Oral Examination (especially for syllabus C and above) for all courses except Translation Skills and Art Historians. 

Examples will be discussed in class.  You will complete various tasks related to this throughout the year.

CLIE language tutors will assist you with Project planning in class; this will help you focus and make sure you are on the right track.

Writing your Project

There are four stages to writing your Project:

1. Topic and title: Discuss and agree the topic and title or question you intend to write your Project on with your CLIE language tutor by Friday 15 December 2017.

2. Proposal: Present a statement of the subject of your Project and the reasons you have chosen this topic (plus indicate the sources you intend to use) in class in the first week of Term 2.  Following discussion and feedback, you should complete the CLIE Course Units Project Proposal Form and submit this to your CLIE language tutor (in class or by email - as directed by your CLIE language tutor) no later than Friday 19 January 2018

Language of the written proposal:

  • Syllabus A, Syllabus B, Syllabus C, Academic Purposes – Introduction: English.
  • Syllabus D, Business and Current Affairs, Current Affairs and Culture, Professional Purposes II/I and II, Academic Purposes II/I and II, Professional and Academic Purposes II: Target language.

You must use the CLIE Course Units Project Proposal Formto submit your proposal.

Should you need to amend your Proposal following feedback you should complete a new form, explaining the reasons for the change, and submit it to your tutor.

3. Draft: Submit a draft of the first part of your Project (approximately 40% of the UPPER word limit for your level).  This will allow your CLIE language tutor to give feedback on structure and content, and also alert you to any main grammatical issues. 

Your draft should be submitted to your CLIE language tutor IN YOUR CLASS in the week BEFORE Reading Week 2 (05-09 February 2018). 

Your draft will be returned to you, with feedback, IN YOUR CLASS in the week AFTER Reading Week 2 (19-23 February 2018). 

If you are taking a 1.0 unit module (30 credits/15 ECTS) please discuss with your CLIE language tutor(s) which class this should be done in. 

You must use the CLIE Course Units Project Draft Formto submit your draft. 

4. Submission and completion: Submit an electronic copy of your Project to Turnitin® PLUS a hard copy** to the Course Units Office by Monday 19 March 2018 at 14:00. 

Your submission to the office must contain your finished Project, your three main sources, plus your Project Proposal Form and Project Draft Form that you received back from your CLIE language tutor.

The proposal and draft of the first part of your Project are an integral/essential part in the development of your Project, and are required in order to gain full points.  

You will receive feedback on your Project after Easter in the first week of Term 3.

Layout and format of your Project

Typed with double-spacing between lines (except for Arabic and Japanese which should be handwritten for certain modules, and for Mandarin which should have the hard copy handwritten and the Turnitin® copy typed – please see your CLIE language tutor for further information).

Folders can be used but single pages should NOT be put in individual pockets/sleeves.

Your completed Proposal Form and Draft Form must be attached to the back of your Project.

You are responsible for keeping a copy of your Project for your own reference as once submitted Projects will not be returned.

Submission of your Project

Projects will only be accepted with the CLIE Project cover sheet, which must be completed with your Project’s word count and be signed.  Your personal cover sheet can be obtained from your CLIE language tutor in late February 2018.

Submission deadline: Monday 19 March 2018 by 14:00

a. Electronic copy

An electronic copy of your Project (excluding sources, Proposal and Draft) must be submitted to Turnitin® via your CLIE module on Moodle by the deadline.

b. Physical copy

A hard copy of your Project must also be submitted to the Course Units Office***. It must contain your Project itself, your three main sources, plus your Project Proposal Form and Project Draft Form that you received back from your CLIE language tutor. 

Where to hand in: 

Submission dates and times: 

  • Wednesday 14 March – Friday 16 March 2018 10:00-17:00
  • Monday 19 March 2018 10:00-14:00

Extenuating circumstances

Reasonable Adjustments

UCL will make Reasonable Adjustments to learning, teaching and assessment to ensure that students with a disability are not put at a disadvantage. UCL also provides Reasonable Adjustments for students who might not consider themselves to have a ‘disability’ but who nevertheless would benefit from additional support due to an ongoing medical or mental health condition. It is the responsibility of the student to request Reasonable Adjustments, and students are encouraged to make a request as early as possible[1].

Special Examination Arrangements

Special Examination Arrangements (SEAs) are adjustments to central or departmental written examinations which can be made as a Reasonable Adjustment for students with a disability or longer-term condition or as a form of mitigation for students with shorter-term medical Extenuating Circumstances. This may include, but is not limited to extra time, a separate room, rest breaks and specialist equipment. Students must make an application to use the special examination facilities[2].

Illness and other Extenuating Circumstances

UCL recognises that some students can experience serious difficulties and personal problems which affect their ability to complete an assessment such as a sudden, serious illness or the death of a close relative. Students need to make sure that they notify UCL of any circumstances which are unexpected, significantly disruptive and beyond their control, and which might have a significant impact on their performance at assessment. UCL can then put in place alternative arrangements, such as an extension or a deferral of assessment to a later date.

The Extenuating Circumstances regulations[3] are designed to cover unexpected emergencies; they are not always the best way to help students who might have a longer-term medical or mental health condition or a disability. Although there may be times when it is necessary for such students to use the EC regulations, students should make sure they are aware of, and take advantage of, all the other support mechanisms provided by UCL such as Reasonable Adjustments or Special Examination Arrangements.

[1] See UCL Academic Manual chapter 4 section 5 (ucl.ac.uk/srs/academic-manual/c4/reasonable-adjustments) and Student Disability Services (ucl.ac.uk/disability).

[2] See the UCL Academic Manual chapter 4 section 3.3 (ucl.ac.uk/srs/academic-manual/c4/examinations/special-examination-arrangements).

[3] See UCL Academic Manual chapter 4 section 6 (ucl.ac.uk/srs/academic-manual/c4/extenuating-circumstances).

Late submission 

Planning, time-management and the meeting of deadlines are part of the personal and professional skills expected of all graduates. For this reason UCL expects students to submit all coursework by the published deadline date and time, after which penalties will be applied[1].

If you experience something which prevents you from meeting a deadline that is sudden, unexpected, significantly disruptive and beyond your control, you should submit an Extenuating Circumstances (EC) Form. If the request is accepted, you may be granted an extension. If the deadline has already passed, the late submission may be condoned i.e. there will be no penalty for submitting late.

For coursework submitted after the published deadline the following penalties will be applied:

  1. If your coursework is received up to two working days after the published deadline: your mark will be reduced by 10 percentage points (but no lower than the pass mark for the module).
  2. If your coursework is received more than two working days and up to five working days after the published deadline: your mark will be no higher than the pass mark (40% for UG modules, 50% for PGT modules).
  3. If your coursework is received more than five working days after the published deadline but before the second week of Term 3: you will get a mark of zero but the assessment will be considered to be complete.
  4. Submissions will not be accepted or marked after the specified publication date. Students failing to meet this deadline will be required to resubmit the failed component(s).
  5. If your coursework is submitted both over- or under-length and is also late: the greater of any penalties will apply.

[1] See UCL Academic Manual chapter 4 section 10.2 (ucl.ac.uk/srs/academic-manual/c4/failure/late-submission).

Over-length coursework

The following policy applies to all modules taught in the Faculties of Arts and Humanities and Social and Historical Sciences for the academic year 2016-2017.

You should adhere to the word count stated in the coursework information for your course. The word count should include the main text and any tables, diagrams and illustrations together with their captions, plus footnotes and endnotes, but not your table of contents, bibliography or appendices (see coursework information for full details). The word count must be stated on your coursework cover sheet.

  1. For work that exceeds a specified maximum length by less than 10% the mark will be reduced by five percentage marks, but the penalised mark will not be reduced below the pass mark, assuming the work merits a Pass.
  2. For work that exceeds a specified maximum length by 10% or more the mark will be reduced by ten percentage marks, but the penalised mark will not be reduced below the pass mark, assuming the work merits a Pass.
  3. If your coursework is submitted both over- or under-length and is also late: the greater of any penalties will apply.

Plagiarism 

Your Project must be your own work and you must read and follow UCL Plagiarism Guidelines. 

All plagiarism will be penalised. Any cases of suspected plagiarism will be challenged – those students will have to complete a task under supervised conditions and/or points will be deducted and could result in zero points for this piece of coursework and the matter referred to the Registrar. A variety of methods are used to detect plagiarism, including the use of the Turnitin® detection system. 

You must NOT duplicate topics you have used for GCSE or any other courses. You may refer to some of the research you have undertaken previously so long as the majority of the sources and bibliography for your Project are up-to-date and there is justification for referencing this older material. 

You must NOT get help from friends, use translation services or copy sources verbatim. You may discuss your Project with a native speaker but you CANNOT show them any of your written work. 

Using a computer spellchecker is acceptable as the correct option still needs to be selected. However using a computer to translate from English into the target language is NOT acceptable: 

  • For your sources – if the source was originally in English then you will get zero points for it; 
  • For your Writing element – which constitutes plagiarism. 

Specific information for each syllabus

Syllabus A

Project description 

Your Project should be related to some aspect of the country (or one of the countries) whose language you are learning (e.g. a city, a personality or cultural habits). You are recommended to relate this to your personal experience. Your topic should be mainly descriptive. Formats can be, for example: a diary, a guide, a letter, a dialogue. 

You should make use of and refer to the documents you submit. 

Your Project MUST include: 

  • A bibliography of ALL relevant sources you have read and used (including FULL internet addresses); 
  • The THREE (3) main sources used (originals or copies). 

Reading Element 

You need to read some target language source documents to gather information on your chosen topic, evidence of which must form part of your Project. 

Amount of material to be read and submitted: THREE (3) text-based documents, TOTAL 500-700 WORDS (Arabic: 300-500 words; Japanese: 1000-1400 characters; Mandarin: 400-600 characters) 

A variety of sources must be used. 

The relevant sections of these documents MUST be marked (either by highlighting or underlining). 

You can obviously read more than this but only this amount should be submitted. For long texts either include ONLY the relevant sections or CROSS THROUGH the other sections. 

Writing Element 

Your Project must be written IN THE TARGET LANGUAGE. A table of contents should be included. 

Number of words required: 250-400 WORDS (Arabic: 200-300 words; Japanese: 800-1200 characters, 2-3 mai genkou-youshi; Mandarin: 250-300 characters) 

Your word count should include the main text and any tables, diagrams and illustrations together with their captions, plus footnotes and endnotes, but not the table of contents, bibliography or appendices. 

Quotations: Quotes should NOT be included in your word count. 

There should not be excessive quoting. 

Marking criteria (specific)

For general information see the Marking criteria (general). 

Undergraduate modules

Reading Points (out of 20):

  • Selection of material (documents should be from a variety of sources) – 5 points;
  • Evaluation (how the documents are evaluated and used/integrated in the Project) – 15 points.

Writing Points (out of 80):

  • Organisation, style and register – 10 points;
  • Content – 20 points;
  • Vocabulary – 10 points;
  • Grammar – 30 points;
  • Spelling and punctuation – 10 points.

M Level and graduate modules

Reading Points (out of 35):

  • Selection of material (documents should be from a variety of sources) – 15 points;
  • Evaluation (how the documents are evaluated and used/integrated in the Project) – 20 points.

Writing Points (out of 65):

  • Organisation, style and register – 10 points;
  • Content – 15 points;
  • Vocabulary – 10 points;
  • Grammar – 25 points;
  • Spelling and punctuation – 5 points.
Syllabus B

Syllabus B

Project description 

Your Project should be related to some aspect of the country (or one of the countries) whose language you are learning. You are recommended to relate this to your personal experience. Your topic should be mainly descriptive. Formats can be, for example: a diary, a guide, a letter, an interview. 

You should make use of and refer to the documents you submit. 

Your Project MUST include: 

  • A bibliography of ALL relevant sources you have read and used (including FULL internet addresses); 
  • The THREE (3) main sources used (originals or copies). 

Reading Element 

You need to read some target language source documents to gather information on your chosen topic, evidence of which must form part of your Project. 

Amount of material to be read and submitted: THREE (3) text-based documents, TOTAL 700-1000 WORDS (Arabic: 500-800 words; Japanese: 1200-1600 characters; Mandarin: 600-800 characters) 

A variety of sources must be used. 

The relevant sections of these documents MUST be marked (either by highlighting or underlining). 

You can obviously read more than this but only this amount should be submitted. For long texts either include ONLY the relevant sections or CROSS THROUGH the other sections. 

Writing Element 

Your Project must be written IN THE TARGET LANGUAGE. A table of contents should be included. 

Number of words required: 450-600 WORDS (Arabic: 450-600 words; Japanese: 1000-1400 characters, 2.5-3.5 mai genkou-youshi; Mandarin: 400-500 characters) 

Your word count should include the main text and any tables, diagrams and illustrations together with their captions, plus footnotes and endnotes, but not the table of contents, bibliography or appendices. 

Quotations: Quotes should NOT be included in your word count. 

There should not be excessive quoting. 

Marking criteria (specific)

For general information see the Marking criteria (general). 

Undergraduate modules

Reading Points (out of 20):

  • Selection of material (documents should be from a variety of sources) – 5 points;
  • Evaluation (how the documents are evaluated and used/integrated in the Project) – 15 points.

Writing Points (out of 80):

  • Organisation, style and register – 10 points;
  • Content – 20 points;
  • Vocabulary – 10 points;
  • Grammar – 30 points;
  • Spelling and punctuation – 10 points.

M Level and graduate modules

Reading Points (out of 35):

  • Selection of material (documents should be from a variety of sources) – 15 points;
  • Evaluation (how the documents are evaluated and used/integrated in the Project) – 20 points.

Writing Points (out of 65):

  • Organisation, style and register – 10 points;
  • Content – 15 points;
  • Vocabulary – 10 points;
  • Grammar – 25 points;
  • Spelling and punctuation – 5 points.
Syllabus C, Academic Purposes - Introduction

Syllabus C, Academic Purposes - Introduction

Project description 

Syllabus C

Your Project should be related to aspects of the country (or one of the countries) whose language you are learning. You should describe and explain an issue or event of your choice and give your informed opinion on it. You are recommended to relate this to your personal experience. 

Academic Purposes – Introduction

Your Project should be related to aspects of the country (or one of the countries) whose language you are learning. You should describe and explain an academic-related issue or event of your choice and give your informed opinion on it. You are recommended to relate this to your personal experience. 


You should make use of and refer to the documents you submit. 

Your Project MUST include: 

  • A bibliography of ALL relevant sources you have read and used (including FULL internet addresses); 
  • The THREE (3) main sources used (originals or copies). 

Reading Element 

You need to read some target language source documents to gather information on your chosen topic, evidence of which must form part of your Project. 

Amount of material to be read and submitted: THREE (3) text-based documents, TOTAL 1200-1500 WORDS (Arabic: 900-1200 words; Japanese: 1400-1800 characters; Mandarin: 1000-1200 characters) 

A variety of sources must be used. 

The relevant sections of these documents MUST be marked (either by highlighting or underlining). 

You can obviously read more than this but only this amount should be submitted. For long texts either include ONLY the relevant sections or CROSS THROUGH the other sections. 

Writing Element 

Your Project must be written IN THE TARGET LANGUAGE. A table of contents should be included. 

Number of words required: 700-800 WORDS (Arabic: 700-800 words; Japanese: 1200-1600 characters, 3-4 mai genkou-youshi; Mandarin: 600-700 characters) 

Your word count should include the main text and any tables, diagrams and illustrations together with their captions, plus footnotes and endnotes, but not the table of contents, bibliography or appendices. 

Quotations: Quotes should NOT be included in your word count. 

There should not be excessive quoting. 

Marking criteria (specific)

For general information see the Marking criteria (general). 

Undergraduate modules

Reading Points (out of 25):

  • Selection of material (documents should be from a variety of sources) – 10 points;
  • Evaluation (how the documents are evaluated and used/integrated in the Project) – 15 points.

Writing Points (out of 75):

  • Organisation – 10 points (Arabic, Japanese, Mandarin: 5 points);
  • Style and register – 10 points (Arabic, Japanese, Mandarin: 5 points);
  • Content – 18 points;
  • Vocabulary – 15 points;
  • Grammar, including spelling and punctuation – 22 points (Arabic, Japanese, Mandarin: 32 points).

M Level and graduate modules

Reading Points (out of 40):

  • Selection of material (documents should be from a variety of sources) – 15 points;
  • Evaluation (how the documents are evaluated and used/integrated in the Project) – 25 points.

Writing Points (out of 60):

  • Organisation – 10 points (Arabic, Japanese, Mandarin: 5 points);
  • Style and register – 10 points (Arabic, Japanese, Mandarin: 5 points);
  • Content – 16 points;
  • Vocabulary – 10 points;
  • Grammar, including spelling and punctuation – 14 points (Arabic, Japanese, Mandarin: 25 points).
Syllabus D

Syllabus D

Project description 

Your Project should be related to aspects of the country (or one of the countries) whose language you are learning. It can be on an issue of your choice; however it should be on a topic that is controversial and/or open to debate. We recommend that you phrase the subtitle of your Project as a question in order to stimulate argumentation and help keep the Project focused. Your Project should review the documents that you have read and discuss the important and controversial (or debatable) aspects of this topic. 

You should make use of and refer to the documents you submit. 

Your Project MUST include: 

  • A bibliography of ALL relevant sources you have read and used (including FULL internet addresses); 
  • The THREE (3) main sources used (originals or copies). 

Reading Element 

You need to read some target language source documents to gather information on your chosen topic, evidence of which must form part of your Project. 

Amount of material to be read and submitted: THREE (3) text-based documents (Arabic: 1200-1500 words; Mandarin: 1200-1500 characters) 

A variety of sources must be used. 

The relevant sections of these documents MUST be marked (either by highlighting or underlining). 

You can obviously read more than this but only this amount should be submitted. For long texts either include ONLY the relevant sections or CROSS THROUGH the other sections. 

Writing Element 

Your Project must be written IN THE TARGET LANGUAGE. A table of contents should be included. 

Number of words required: 900-1100 WORDS (Arabic: 900-1100 words; Japanese: 1400-1800 characters, 3.5-4.5 mai genkou-youshi; Mandarin: 800-900 characters) 

Your word count should include the main text and any tables, diagrams and illustrations together with their captions, plus footnotes and endnotes, but not the table of contents, bibliography or appendices. 

Quotations: 

  • Short quotes SHOULD be included in your word count.
  • Extended quotations (of more than two lines) should be indented in the text and should NOT be included in the word count. 

There should not be excessive quoting. 

Marking criteria (specific)

For general information see the Marking criteria (general). 

Undergraduate modules

Reading Points (out of 25):

  • Selection of material (documents should be from a variety of sources) – 10 points;
  • Evaluation (how the documents are evaluated and used/integrated in the Project) – 15 points.

Writing Points (out of 75):

  • Organisation – 10 points (Arabic, Japanese, Mandarin: 5 points);
  • Style and register – 10 points (Arabic, Japanese, Mandarin: 5 points);
  • Content – 18 points;
  • Vocabulary – 15 points;
  • Grammar, including spelling and punctuation – 22 points (Arabic, Japanese, Mandarin: 32 points).

M Level and graduate modules

Reading Points (out of 40):

  • Selection of material (documents should be from a variety of sources) – 15 points;
  • Evaluation (how the documents are evaluated and used/integrated in the Project) – 25 points.

Writing Points (out of 60):

  • Organisation – 10 points (Arabic, Japanese, Mandarin: 5 points);
  • Style and register – 10 points (Arabic, Japanese, Mandarin: 5 points);
  • Content – 16 points;
  • Vocabulary – 10 points;
  • Grammar, including spelling and punctuation – 14 points (Arabic, Japanese, Mandarin: 25 points).
Business and Current Affairs

Business and Current Affairs

Project description 

Your Project should be related to aspects of business and/or current affairs of the country (or one of the countries) whose language you are learning. It can be on an issue of your choice; however it should be on a topic that is controversial and/or open to debate. We recommend that you phrase the subtitle of your Project as a question in order to stimulate argumentation and help keep the Project focused. Your Project should review the documents that you have read and discuss the important and controversial (or debatable) aspects of this topic. 

You should make use of and refer to the documents you submit. 

Your Project MUST include: 

  • A bibliography of ALL relevant sources you have read and used (including FULL internet addresses); 
  • The THREE (3) main sources used (originals or copies). 

Reading Element 

You need to read some target language source documents to gather information on your chosen topic, evidence of which must form part of your Project. 

Amount of material to be read and submitted: THREE (3) text-based documents (Arabic: 1500-1800 words; Mandarin: 1500-1800 characters) 

A variety of sources must be used. 

The relevant sections of these documents MUST be marked (either by highlighting or underlining). 

You can obviously read more than this but only this amount should be submitted. For long texts either include ONLY the relevant sections or CROSS THROUGH the other sections. 

Writing Element 

Your Project must be written IN THE TARGET LANGUAGE. A table of contents should be included. 

Number of words required: 1100-1300 WORDS (Arabic: 1100-1300 words; Japanese: 1600-2000 characters, 4-5 mai genkou-youshi; Mandarin: 1000-1200 characters) 

Your word count should include the main text and any tables, diagrams and illustrations together with their captions, plus footnotes and endnotes, but not the table of contents, bibliography or appendices. 

Quotations: 

  • Short quotes SHOULD be included in your word count.
  • Extended quotations (of more than two lines) should be indented in the text and should NOT be included in the word count. 

There should not be excessive quoting. 

Marking criteria (specific)

For general information see the Marking criteria (general). 

Undergraduate modules

Reading Points (out of 25):

  • Selection of material (documents should be from a variety of sources) – 10 points;
  • Evaluation (how the documents are evaluated and used/integrated in the Project) – 15 points.

Writing Points (out of 75):

  • Organisation – 10 points (Arabic, Japanese, Mandarin: 5 points);
  • Style and register – 10 points (Arabic, Japanese, Mandarin: 5 points);
  • Content – 18 points;
  • Vocabulary – 15 points;
  • Grammar, including spelling and punctuation – 22 points (Arabic, Japanese, Mandarin: 32 points).

M Level and graduate modules

Reading Points (out of 40):

  • Selection of material (documents should be from a variety of sources) – 15 points;
  • Evaluation (how the documents are evaluated and used/integrated in the Project) – 25 points.

Writing Points (out of 60):

  • Organisation – 10 points (Arabic, Japanese, Mandarin: 5 points);
  • Style and register – 10 points (Arabic, Japanese, Mandarin: 5 points);
  • Content – 16 points;
  • Vocabulary – 10 points;
  • Grammar, including spelling and punctuation – 14 points (Arabic, Japanese, Mandarin: 25 points).
Current Affairs and Culture

Current Affairs and Culture

Project description 

Your Project should be related to aspects of business and/or current affairs and/or social, historical and political culture of the country (or one of the countries) whose language you are learning. It can be on an issue of your choice; however it should be on a topic that is controversial and/or open to debate. We recommend that you phrase the subtitle of your Project as a question in order to stimulate argumentation and help keep the Project focused. Your Project should review the documents that you have read and discuss 

You should make use of and refer to the documents you submit. 

Your Project MUST include: 

  • A bibliography of ALL relevant sources you have read and used (including FULL internet addresses); 
  • The THREE (3) main sources used (originals or copies). 

Reading Element 

You need to read some target language source documents to gather information on your chosen topic, evidence of which must form part of your Project. 

Amount of material to be read and submitted: THREE (3) text-based documents (Mandarin: 1800-2100 characters) 

A variety of sources must be used. 

The relevant sections of these documents MUST be marked (either by highlighting or underlining). 

You can obviously read more than this but only this amount should be submitted. For long texts either include ONLY the relevant sections or CROSS THROUGH the other sections. 

Writing Element 

Your Project must be written IN THE TARGET LANGUAGE. A table of contents should be included. 

Number of words required: 1300-1500 WORDS (Japanese: 2000-2400 characters, 5-6 mai genkou-youshi; Mandarin: 1300-1500 characters) 

Your word count should include the main text and any tables, diagrams and illustrations together with their captions, plus footnotes and endnotes, but not the table of contents, bibliography or appendices. 

Quotations: 

  • Short quotes SHOULD be included in your word count.
  • Extended quotations (of more than two lines) should be indented in the text and should NOT be included in the word count. 

There should not be excessive quoting. 

Marking criteria (specific)

For general information see the Marking criteria (general). 

Undergraduate modules

Reading Points (out of 25):

  • Selection of material (documents should be from a variety of sources) – 10 points;
  • Evaluation (how the documents are evaluated and used/integrated in the Project) – 15 points.

Writing Points (out of 75):

  • Organisation – 10 points (Arabic, Japanese, Mandarin: 5 points);
  • Style and register – 10 points (Arabic, Japanese, Mandarin: 5 points);
  • Content – 18 points;
  • Vocabulary – 15 points;
  • Grammar, including spelling and punctuation – 22 points (Arabic, Japanese, Mandarin: 32 points).

M Level and graduate modules

Reading Points (out of 40):

  • Selection of material (documents should be from a variety of sources) – 15 points;
  • Evaluation (how the documents are evaluated and used/integrated in the Project) – 25 points.

Writing Points (out of 60):

  • Organisation – 10 points (Arabic, Japanese, Mandarin: 5 points);
  • Style and register – 10 points (Arabic, Japanese, Mandarin: 5 points);
  • Content – 16 points;
  • Vocabulary – 10 points;
  • Grammar, including spelling and punctuation – 14 points (Arabic, Japanese, Mandarin: 25 points).
Professional Purposes II/I and II, Academic Purposes II/I and II, Professional and Academic Purposes II

Professional Purposes II/I and II, Academic Purposes II/I and II, Professional and Academic Purposes II

Project description 

Your Project should be related to aspects of the professional/academic use of the language you are learning (for example in the area of your main degree subject or intended career). It can be on an issue of your choice; however it should be on a topic that is controversial and/or open to debate. We recommend that you phrase the subtitle of your Project as a question in order to stimulate argumentation and help keep the Project focused. Your Project should review the documents that you have read and discuss the important and controversial (or debatable) aspects of this topic. 

You should make use of and refer to the documents you submit. 

Your Project MUST include: 

  • A bibliography of ALL relevant sources you have read and used (including FULL internet addresses); 
  • The THREE (3) main sources used (originals or copies). 

Reading/Listening Element 

You need to research your chosen topic through reading some target language source documents, listening to tv/radio programmes or through structured discussions. You are encouraged to gain additional information through interviews and/or questionnaires with native speakers. Evidence of these must form part of your Project. Notes and transcripts will be considered as suitable sources. 

Number of pieces of material to be submitted: THREE (3) sources of different formats/types (Mandarin: 2100-2500 characters) 

The relevant sections of these documents MUST be marked (either by highlighting or underlining). 

You can obviously read/listen to more than this but only this amount should be submitted. For long texts either include ONLY the relevant sections or CROSS THROUGH the other sections. 

Writing Element 

Your Project must be written IN THE TARGET LANGUAGE. A table of contents should be included. 

Number of words required: 2000-2500 WORDS (Japanese: 2400-2800 characters, 6-7 mai genkou-youshi; Mandarin: 2000-2500 characters) 

Your word count should include the main text and any tables, diagrams and illustrations together with their captions, plus footnotes and endnotes, but not the table of contents, bibliography or appendices. 

Quotations: 

  • Short quotes SHOULD be included in your word count. 
  • Extended quotations (of more than two lines) should be indented in the text and should NOT be included in the word count. 

There should not be excessive quoting. 

Marking criteria (specific) 

For general information see the Marking criteria (general). 

Undergraduate modules

Reading/Listening Points (out of 25):

  • Selection of material (material should be from a variety of sources) – 10 points;
  • Evaluation (how the material is evaluated and used/integrated in the Project) – 15 points.

Writing Points (out of 75):

  • Organisation – 15 points;
  • Style and register – 11 points;
  • Content – 12 points;
  • Vocabulary – 15 points;
  • Grammar, including spelling and punctuation – 22 points.

M Level and graduate modules

Reading/Listening Points (out of 40):

  • Selection of material (material should be from a variety of sources) – 15 points;
  • Evaluation (how the material is evaluated and used/integrated in the Project) – 25 points.

Writing Points (out of 60):

  • Organisation – 11.5 points;
  • Style and register – 9 points;
  • Content – 10 points;
  • Vocabulary – 11.5 points;
  • Grammar, including spelling and punctuation – 18 points.
Translation Skills

Translation Skills

Project description

Your project will consist of the translation into the target language (TL) of one to three English source texts (STs) totaling 1500 words and a set of ten annotations on the translation (500-700 words).  Through these annotations you should comment on specific translation problems you encountered and how you dealt with them, thus demonstrating your understanding of the translation process and your ability to use relevant translation strategies.  In the first of these annotations, you are required to describe briefly the genre, audience and purpose of the ST (GAP analysis) and explain how these three aspects have informed your translation choices.  You are free to choose the ST(s) – they could be related to your main degree subject or to a subject you are particularly interested in – but they must be submitted to your CLIE language tutor for approval by Friday 29 January 2016.  Your tutor’s approval of the ST(s) will depend on the level of difficulty and on whether a translation of the text(s) is already available.  Where more than one ST is chosen, they must be on different aspects of the same topic.

Number of words required: 1500 WORDS (source text, NOT your translation) + 500-700 WORDS (annotations)

Your Project MUST include:

  • The source text(s) (STs) including word count;
  • Your translation of the source text(s) (STs) including word count;
  • The annotations;
  • A list of relevant references as applicable.

Marking criteria (specific)

For general information see the Marking criteria (general). 

Undergraduate, M Level and graduate modules

Translation points (out of 67):

  • Comprehension and transfer of message – 23 points;
  • Readability and cohesion – 17 points;
  • Range and accuracy of lexis – 10 points;
  • Range and accuracy of grammar – 10 points;
  • Technical aspects – 7 points.

Annotations points (out of 33):

  • Completeness of task – 5 points;
  • Relevance – 8 points;
  • Accuracy and clarity – 10 points;
  • Range – 7 points;
  • Presentation – 3 points.
Art Historians

Art Historians

Project description

Your Project should describe, summarise and explain the main ideas from several target language art-related texts offering different perspectives on your chosen topic and the issue(s) you address.  These texts can be comparative or related.  We recommend that you phrase the subtitle of your Project as a question in order to stimulate argumentation and help keep the Project focused.  Your Project should review and refer to the documents that you have read and discuss the issues.  You need to demonstrate a deep understanding of your chosen texts.  

Your Project MUST include:

  • A bibliography of ALL relevant sources you have read and used (including FULL internet addresses);
  • The THREE (3) main sources used (originals or copies).  

Reading Element

You need to read some target language source documents to gather information on your chosen topic, evidence of which must form part of your Project.

Amount of material to be read and submitted: APPROXIMATELY 2500 WORDS

Number of pieces of material to be submitted: THREE (3) text-based documents

The relevant sections of these documents MUST be marked (either by highlighting or underlining).

You can obviously read more than this but only this amount should be submitted.  For long texts either include ONLY the relevant sections or CROSS THROUGH the other sections.

Writing Element

Your Project must be written IN ENGLISH.  A table of contents should be included.

Number of words required: 1400-1600 WORDS

Your word count should include the main text and any tables, diagrams and illustrations together with their captions, plus footnotes and endnotes, but not the table of contents, bibliography or appendices.

Quotations:

  • Short quotes SHOULD be included in your word count.
  • Extended quotations (of more than two lines) should be indented in the text and should NOT be included in the word count.

There should not be excessive quoting.

Marking criteria (specific)

For general information see the Marking criteria (general). 

Reading Points (out of 50):

  • Selection of material (documents should be from a variety of sources) – 20 points;
  • Evaluation (how the documents are evaluated and used/integrated in the Project) – 30 points.

Writing Points (out of 50):

  • Organisation – 15 points;
  • Content/understanding – 15 points;
  • Key ideas – 5 points;
  • Summary – 15 points.

Additional information specific to Art Historians

We are interested in the reading and writing process of your Project, as this process will help you to learn both the target language and art related information in the target language.

Additional information 

We expect language appropriate to your level. We are interested in the reading and writing process of your Project, as this process will help you to learn both language and information about countries where the language is spoken. 

If sources are not submitted with your Project you will get zero points for Reading. 

The research you do for your Project will help you in your Oral Examination*. 


* The Oral Examination does not apply to Translation Skills and Art Historians.

** Unless you have been notified in writing by the CLIE that you only need to submit an electronic copy.

*** Ibid.

Coursework

Coursework at Computer Science

Coursework covers a broad range of assessment methods, including for example: written reports, essays, technical questions, programming tasks, application development, lab and in-class tests, online MCQs, presentations, practical and demonstrations. Most modules have one or more coursework-based assessments. Some courseworks comprise multiple tasks; for example, a coursework might include a written report, a practical demonstration, and a presentation.

You can find out how your modules are assessed, and whether they include coursework assessments, via the module directory (syllabus). Please refer to the home department of any non-Computer Science modules you are taking.

The composition of any coursework assessments, including how any tasks are weighted, any specific instructions, the date or assessment or submission deadline, and how feedback will be provided, will be specified via the module’s Moodle page.

Support with completing coursework

Coursework, as with any assessment, is designed to challenge you. However, if you have issues with your coursework, are not clear on the instructions or some aspect of the task, you should ask the lecturer who set the task. We encourage students to make use of the module's Moodle discussion forum for this, so that responses are shared with the whole cohort.


Submission of coursework

Most coursework tasks require you to submit work such as, for example, written reports, answers to questions, software/ design artefacts, and data. Arrangments for submisison of work vary by department, so you must ensure you follow the procedure that relates to your module/s (find this out well in advance of the submission deadline.)

At Computer Science you will typically be asked to submit your work by 12:00 noon (midday) in one of two ways (occasionally both): digitally or in hard-copy.

Digital submission

Digital submission of coursework is via the module's Moodle page, either via an Assignment or Turnitin Assignment (which includes a plagiarism check.) Submission via Moodle includes organsing your files, uploading , checking, submitting, and re-checking. It is not instantaneous and can take several minutes at least. You should allow yourself sufficient time to ensure your work is successfully submitted before the deadline. You should also be sure to allow time to check you have submitted the right version of your work and, if necessary, resubmit. Do not leave digitial cousework submission to the last minute.

Hard-copy submission

Hard-copy submission of coursework is via the Computer Science Departmental Office (Malet Place Engineering Building, Room 5.17) during office hours. Your work must be appopriately organised (e.g. stapled, bound, or otherwise kept together) and have a completed, signed Coursework coversheet attached as the front-page. You should allow yourself sufficient time to print and organise your work, and consider how long it may take you to do. You should also factor in where any lectures take place on the deadline date, for example if you have lectures away from the main campus. Where possible you should aim to submit in advance of the deadline. Do not leave hard-copy submission to the last minute.


Support with coursework submisison

The UCL Moodle Wiki provides guidance on how to submit work via Moodle. Technical support is available from UCL ISD (email: servicedesk@ucl.ac.uk; phone: 020 7679 5000.)


Late submission

Work recieved after 12:00 noon (midday) of the day of the submission deadline will be considered late. By default, the UCL late submission penalties will then be applied (i.e. to reduce the mark awarded.) In some cases, modules have non-standard late submission rules that have been agreed by the Depatmental Teaching Committee. These will be advertised via the modules' Moodle page at the point the coursework is set.


Extenuating Circumstances

Requests for extension of the deadline or condoned late submission must be made through the Extenuating Circumstances procedure.

If you need advice on how to apply through the procedure, you should speak with your Programme Administrator in the first instance. A list of programme contacts is available from the teaching contacts page. The department's Extenuating Circumstances page gives further information on the procedure and sources of advice and support.


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